Salespeople sell. It’s what they do. So when you have your dream sales job in sight, closing your interview says a lot about who you are and what you’re capable of to a company. And that requires a certain touch.

Exude confidence. You know you’re capable of thriving in the sales position. But the trick is convincing the hiring manager or HR rep of the same. And that’s where confidence plays such a critical role in you ultimately landing the job.

Think about the interview as a sales meeting with a potential customer. Does it help your cause when you beam with enthusiasm and absolute confidence in the widget you’re selling? Of course it does. So imagine yourself as that widget when approaching an interview.

Create a rapport. No one wants to interview a sales candidate that’s as stiff as lumber, much less hire that person to join their sales team. So while you obviously want to be professional during an interview, don’t confuse that with acting stale, stiff, and dull.

Being conversational and creating a rapport with the interviewer highlights your personable side, something that’s critical for a culture match with the organization. Ask them how their weekend went and show genuine interest in them as a person, especially on Zoom interviews that already limit human connections.

Be bold and chart new territory. Expanding on the previous point, uniformity is another migraine waiting to happen for a hiring manager. When it comes to recruiting, there aren’t many things more trying than an endless parade of candidates that act, look, and speak the same.

That’s yet another reason why you shouldn’t hesitate to be bold and different – within reason, of course. And that boldness can take many different forms:

  • Ask where you stand versus other candidates.
  • Do they need to consult with their manager? Offer to reach out directly.
  • Ask for constructive criticism to help you improve for the next interview.
  • Be enthusiastic and say what makes you such a great fit for the role and company.

Close with gusto. For sales calls, you probably have a stable of emphatic sayings and stories that help you seal the deal. Or at least progress the customer further down the funnel.

Doesn’t it make sense to be just as prepared to close on an interview? Sure, every candidate is going to do some background research and speak knowledgeably about the job and company. But how many have worked on putting a convincing bow around the interview?

Remember, you’re giving the sales organization a sneak preview of what they can expect from your skill set, work ethic, demeanor, and perspective during an interview. Think of it as a meeting with an A-list prospect, do your homework, and close like a champ.